(c) 2011 We the People Folk Group, Nashville, TN  all rights reserved
John Terrence (upright bass, bass guitar, vocals) ...

John Terrence performed and recorded with We the People in 2010 to 2011, and was instrumental in finding many of the other musicians who brought their talents to the group.  Besides playing upright and electric bass, John’s unique voice can be heard as ‘Joe Hill’  in our rendition of that classic.
John is versed in a variety of styles, such as traditional Country, Americana, Folk, Blues, Jazz, Bluegrass, and Swing.  He moved to Nashville in 2002 from New York City’s Greenwich Village where he lived for twenty-two years. As a sideman he kept busy in the then thriving NYC music scene supporting an assortment of acts and artists in addition to playing the bass-playing character Eddie, in the stage production of Pump Boys & Dinettes.  He was also co-founder of the Concrete Canyon Cowpersons.
Since moving to Nashville he has worked with legendary acts such as Billy Joe Royal, Charlie Louvin, T. Graham Brown, Walter Egan, Marion James; an assortment of Bluegrass acts including The Roland White Band, George Clark and Dixie Flyer; and Country acts such as Tanya Tucker, Lynn Anderson, Josh Gracin, Buddy Jewel, Lori Morgan, Catherine Britt, Little Jimmy Dickens, as well as R&B and Soul legend Clifford Curry, Jazz & Blues Hammond B3 master Moe Denham, Les Kerr, and many more.
One pet project of John Terrence is his Art Decco Trio, consisting of piano, upright bass & drums, which performs music from the great American Songbook.
John and his wife, Pat, are passionate animal lovers who donate their time as volunteers for the Nashville Humane Association.  John is also a credentialed volunteer Tennessee D.A.R.T, (Disaster Animal Response Team), member.

Where John lived in Greenwich Village
This is the building John Terrence lived in for 22 years -
right in the heart of Greenwich Village on the corner of Bleecker & MacDougal - once the folk music capital of the world. 
John lived above the Figaro, Bob Dylan lived in one of those townhouses, and Arlo Guthrie told him that Phil Ochs at one time lived next door, to the left of the shop next to the Figaro.
Like most things cool, the Figaro is gone, along with its notable beatnik and folk history.  It was a great place to live. 
In the 80's there was a great vinyl Folk anthology called Bleecker & MacDougal. 
There were night clubs everywhere.  The Village Gate and the Bitter End were a block away; the Bottom Line was a couple of blocks away near Washington Square Park. 
John reminisces about the good times there, although it's not the same anymore. 
John Terrence playing electric bass
John Terrence upright bass and vocals John Terrence upright bass and vocals
John Terrence upright bass and vocals John Terrence upright bass and vocals
John Terrence upright bass and vocals John Terrence upright bass and vocals
John Terrence upright bass and vocals John Terrence upright bass and vocals